Travel and Tourism 2016-11-03T08:13:34+00:00

Travel and Tourism

Travel and tourism is an important industry in many regions; the industry can bring external money into a region’s economy, fueling the development of jobs, new industry, and amenities. An area that serves as a travel/tourist destination also increases regional pride. 

Data for this indicator was obtained from Dean Runyan Associates, which compiles data for Visit California. Spending was summed across the counties in each of the regions to arrive at the regional total. Spending was adjusted to 2015 dollars using the All Urban Consumers, U.S. city average consumer price index obtained from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

This graph shows the amount of money visitors spend in the NSJV and surrounding regions (Mother Lode, SSJV, and the Greater Sacramento area) in millions of 2015 dollars. In 2015 visitors to the Greater Sacramento Area spent $5.8 billion, compared to $1.5 billion in the NSJV. S

Spending per resident was $956 in the NSJV compared to $2,374 in Greater Sacramento and over $6,000 in the Mother Lode region. A variety of factors contribute to an area drawing/being attractive to visitors. For example, the state capitol in Sacramento, Mother Lode wine country, and the cities of Fresno and Bakersfield, which are both significantly larger than any city in the NSJV,  may explain why other surrounding areas have higher spending rates.

Data for this indicator was obtained from Dean Runyan Associates, which compiles data for Visit California. Spending was summed across the three NSJV counties to arrive at the NSJV total. Spending was adjusted to 2015 dollars using the All Urban Consumers, U.S. city average consumer price index obtained from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

This graph shows the time series of total tourism spending in millions in the NSJV. Nominal spending was adjusted for inflation using the U.S. city average, all urban consumers, consumer price index. Tourism spending peaked in 2006 just before the Great Recession. Spending fell 14% from that peak during the recession. While tourism spending has not yet recovered to the pre-recession peak, it has recovered to levels above 2004.