Social Capital 2016-11-03T05:52:54+00:00

Social Capital

Social capital refers to the institutions, relationships, and norms that shape the quality and quantity of a society’s social interactions. It also encompasses the resources available in and through personal and business networks; these resources include information, ideas, leads, business opportunities, access to financial capital, power and influence, and emotional support. An engaged citizenry shares in the responsibility to advance the common good, is committed to the community, and holds a level of trust in community institutions. Increasing evidence shows that social cohesion is critical for societies to prosper economically and for development to be sustainable. 

Data for this indicator was obtained from the National Center for Charitable Statistics, and the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey (ACS), 1-year estimates. Data on the number of non-profits in each county was obtained from the National Center for Charitable Statics. Data for the three counties was then summed to get the NSJV total. This total was then divided by the NSJV population obtained from the ACS and multiplied by 10,000.

This graph shows the number of non-profit organizations per 10,000 residents in California and the NSJV. Non-profits build social capital for individuals and communities and contribute to a healthy and viable community. Areas with more non-profits can be more successful as a stronger bridge between government programs and local needs exists. Although the number of non-profits per 10,000 residents had been steadily declining from 2011 to 2014, a strong increase in 2015 brought the number of non-profits per 10,000 residents to just above its 2011 value for both California and the NSJV. Despite this increase in the NSJV ratio, there are still approximately 10 more non-profits per 10,000 residents in California as a whole than in the NSJV.

Data for this indicator was obtained from the California Secretary of State based on voter registration and turnout for the June 2016 primary election.

This graph shows the percent of eligible voters that were registered to vote in the June 2016 primaries, along with the percent of registered and eligible voters that actually voted in the primaries for both California and the NSJV. California beat the NSJV in all categories measured in this indicator, although the NSJV performed better in all categories in the June 2016 primaries than it did in the 2014 midterm elections. California only performed better in two of the measures. The NSJV saw 3 percentage points more of eligible voters register, 2 percentage points more of registered voters turnout to vote, and 2 percentage points more of eligible voters turnout to vote. Conversely, California saw less of its eligible voters register, although turnout was still better than the 2014 elections. While this is a positive sign, years in which there is a presidential election generally see larger turnout than midterm election years.