Safety 2017-08-29T20:19:30+00:00

Safety

Public safety issues have social and economic impacts. Members of a society are more likely to feel a sense of community with neighbors if areas are safer. Businesses are more likely to locate to areas with less crime, and customers are more likely to visit businesses in areas that are safer. There is a strong correlation between income and safety. For this reason, various measures of safety can indicate how a region is doing economically. Safety can be measured in many ways including crime rates, number of public safety officers, and domestic violence.

Data for this indicator was obtained from the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI).

This graph shows the number of violent crimes that occur per 100,000 residents in California and the NSJV counties. Crimes included in this indicator are: murder and nonnegligent manslaughter, rape, robbery, and aggravated assault. Violent crime rates in the NJSV have decreased slightly in all counties with the largest decrease seen in San Joaquin County. Despite this decrease, however, the California violent crime rate remains below all of the NSJV counties.

Data for this indicator was obtained from the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI).

This graph shows the violent crimes for 2015 by type of crime. While all crime is bad, al violent crime is especially horrible. With that in mind, the Federal Bureau of Investigation still ranks violent crimes from worst to “least worst”. In decreasing order of severity the ranking of violent crimes is as follows: murder and nonnegligent manslaughter, rape, robbery, and aggravated assault. While the NSJV violent crime rate is higher than California, assault is by far the most common type of violent crime. Murder and rape, the two worst types of violent crime, make up only 5% of total violent crime in the NSJV. This is a decrease of 2 percentage points from the prior year.

Data for this indicator was obtained from the California Department of Justice, Office of the Attorney General, and the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey (ACS) 1-year estimates. Data on the number of felonies in each county is from the Office of the Attorney General of California. This data is summed across the three NSJV counties. The number of felonies is then divided by the population obtained from the ACS and multiplied by 100,000 to obtain the rate per 100,000 residents.

This graph shows the adult and juvenile felony offense rate per 100,000 residents for California and the NSJV. The adult and juvenile felony rates decreased in the NSJV and California from 2006 to 2011. In 2012 through 2014 the rates in California remained fairly constant while the rates in the NSJV increased. This may have had to do with the Stockton bankruptcy when the city had to severely downsize its police force. While this only affected Stockton and the surrounding areas, Stockton is a large enough city that this would influence the region’s felony offense rate. The drastic decrease in the felony offense rate seen by both California and the NSJV in 2015 was attributable mostly to the passage of Proposition 47 in 2014. Proposition 47 reclassified certain non-violent crimes, primarily drug offenses and petty theft, from felonies to misdemeanors. As such, drug related felony arrests decreased almost 80% driving down the overall felony offense rate.