Income2018-12-13T22:56:55+00:00

Income

Income is an important measure of a community’s standard of living. Regions with higher income levels tend to have more educational, recreational, and entertainment opportunities as well as lower crimes rates. Income is not simply made up of the money people earn from work but also includes interest, dividends, social security, workers compensation, pensions as well as non-cash transfer payments such as food stamps, health benefits, and subsidized housing.

Data for this indicator was obtained from the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) table CA1. Data was adjusted to 2016 dollars using the All Urban Consumers, U.S. city average consumer price index obtained from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Data for this indicator was obtained from the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey, 1-year estimates. Data was adjusted to 2016 dollars using the All Urban Consumers, U.S. city average consumer price index obtained from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Data for this indicator was obtained from the Bureau of Labor Statistic’s Occupational Employment Statistics. The ratio was then calculated by dividing the 75th percentile wage by the 25th percentile wage.

Data for this indicator was obtained from the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey, 1-year estimates. This indicator shows the official federal poverty rate.

Data for the official poverty rate was obtained from the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey, 1-year estimates.

Data for the California Poverty Measure (CPM) was obtained from the Public Policy Institute of California (PPIC). Developed by the the Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality and the PPIC, the CPM considers other factors such as government assistance and housing costs when calculating poverty levels.